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Winning kicks

Jan 13, 2005
Four NFL playoff games are scheduled to kick off this weekend. Whichever teams advance, the league will ultimately be the winner. During a record-setting regular season, the NFL scored more than $5 billion in revenue. Marketplace commentator David Carter says a lot of the credit goes to the league's business model.

Those emerging markets

Jan 13, 2005
A lot of folks are investing in so-called emerging markets these days. But just how smart of a move is it to put your hard-earned money into one of these developing countries? Host Kai Ryssdal gets Marketplace's money guru Chris Farrell to size things up.

The power of the food pyramid

Jan 12, 2005
In hopes of encouraging people to eat right, the Department of Agriculture created a food pyramid. Well, today, the guidelines for building such a pyramid were updated for the first time in 10 years. What we're seeing today - the guidelines - are the result of months of comment for the public at large, from expert nutritionists... and from more than a few lobbyists from the food industry. From our Health Desk at WGBH, Helen Palmer reports on the power of the pyramid.

Even faster - fast food?

Jan 12, 2005
While we're waiting for them to decide what to with that pyramid, let's eat. Considering how long you have to wait in line at some of these places, they might just have a decision. Not to complain, but isn't fast food supposed to be fast? Now some McDonald's restaurants in Colorado, Minnesota, and Missouri are trying a system that's supposed to get people back on the road more quickly. From KUNC in Greeley, Colorado, Nancy Greenlease reports.

The secret life of file-sharing

Jan 12, 2005
It's hard to imagine you haven't heard something by now about file-swapping. As the story is often told, music and movie files are swapped by computer users over peer to peer networks: Kazaa, LimeWire, Morpheus... But in fact this view of file-swapping--'you have something I want, I have something you want' - is misleading. In the latest edition of Wired Magazine, writer Jeff Howe explains that the vast majority of files being traded on the web - illegally - originate on one of about 30 super secretive servers.

Coming home

Jan 12, 2005
As much as soldiers want to come home from Iraq -- it's not always a smooth transition. Sometimes families have grown apart. Or there are financial problems. It can be tough to readjust to working again in a civilian job. But on that last front - veterans may have an edge. Eric Niiler reports from Baltimore.

Methamphetamine wars

Jan 12, 2005
This year, about 20 states are looking at restricting the sales of cold medicines. Lawmakers are worried about the ingredient, pseudo-ephedrine. It can be used to make methamphetamine, a drug that's become a big problem, especially in rural states. But as Ashley Milne-Tyte reports, drug stores aren't too keen on the restrictions. Also, People who make methamphetamines set up their labs in all kinds of places - including hotels. Our Saavy Traveler Rudy Maxa says this is nothing to be casual about.

Saving the children

Jan 12, 2005
Along the coast of Sri Lanka, schools have been wiped to a flat bed of rubble. Those that haven't been destroyed are being used as relief camps for the homeless. Children inside the relief camps may be at risk, as Miranda Kennedy reports from Batticaloa.

Tomorrow: Securities and the Supreme Court

Jan 11, 2005
After the collapse of corporate giants like Enron, Worldcom, and the like, investors brought a string of lawsuits claiming billions were lost because companies lied about their condition. Tricky thing though: to prove that something the company said was what caused investors to lose money. Tomorrow at the Supreme Court: arguments in a case that's being called one of the most important in securities law in a decade. David Skeel is a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania...

Hispanic banking (or lack thereof)

Jan 11, 2005
Many Mexicans work low-paying jobs in the states, and send money to support relatives back home. Last year, those remittances were worth about $15 billion. But that money rarely travels by way of a bank. In fact, many Latinos - even those living for decades in this country - don't use banks at all. As Marketplace's Jeff Tyler reports, some financial services companies are starting to recognize the untapped potential of those some call the "unbanked."

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