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Spy story

Mar 2, 2005
Today a ruling from the high court that may affect your relationship with your employer. If you're hired as a spy for the U.S. government, that is. The justices say two former spies cannot sue the CIA for reneging on a promise of lifetime support. The ruling reads like a cross between a Stephen Ambrose history and a Tom Clancy thriller. Marketplace's Matthew Algeo reports.

Pushing reform in the Middle East

Mar 2, 2005
Today the protests continued in Lebanon. Locals call it the "Syria Out" campaign. Lebanese activists have taken to the streets demanding that Syria pull out its troops. President Bush today issued a similar demand to Syria. A more complicated question for the U.S. may be how to capitalize on this momentum. How to encourage democratic reform in the Mideast. In the new issue of Foreign Affairs magazine, an idea. Use money. Steven Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations is the author of "The Right Way to Promote Arab Reform".

An educational warning shot

Mar 2, 2005
Public high schools are in trouble. That warning came from the nation's governors during their National Education Summit this past weekend. Of every 100 high schoolers, only 68 graduate on time. And far too many drop out altogether. The governors say only drastic change will keep millions of students from falling short. But are they ready to do something about it? In this edition of The Public's Business, Marketplace commentator Robert Reich says if they are, he has a solution.

Marketing medicine ...

Mar 2, 2005
The adverse side effects and recall of blockbuster pharmaceuticals likeVioxx are grabbing headlines. Yet some doctors contend that the real issuegoes deeper. For every FDA-approved drug withdrawn from patient circulationbelatedly, after adverse side effects surface, there are many more new drugswaiting in the wings. Some are extraordinary. Others may not be pioneering in anything but their marketing campaigns. The question is how to tell the difference. Pamela Renner reports on calls for change coming from within themedical profession.

Debating bankruptcy reform

Mar 1, 2005
The Senate is debating a bill on bankruptcy reform this week, that would make it tougher for consumers to cancel their debts. Commentator University of Pennsylvania law professor David Skeel thinks the reforms should extend to corporate bankruptcies, too.

The elders speak

Mar 1, 2005
Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas has pledged to reform the Palestinian political structure. But what about the judicial system? From Ramallah, Nancy Updike reports on disorder in the courts.

Yahoo! birthday

Mar 1, 2005
Yahoo celebrates its 10th birthday tomorrow. And although Google has gotten all the buzz recently, Yahoo is still the market leader. Host David Brown talks to Wired reporter Michael Malone about the search engine wars.

Bulls pay ... to play

Mar 1, 2005
Have you ever dreamed of sitting courtside, next to the sports journalists? How about working as a ball boy at a professional basketball game? Well, the Chicago Bulls are using those everyman dreams to generate additional revenue. Sandy Hausman reports from Chicago.

The view from the court!

Feb 28, 2005
An unprecedented action by a huge corporate defendant. The words of a judge who today okayed a settlement between DuPont and people living near a West Virginia Teflon plant. Dupont does not admit a chemical used at the plant caused any illness. But the company has agreed to spend $107 million on tests of local water supplies. DuPont may have to spend another $235 million to monitor the health of nearby residents. Also today, word on three cases involving money coming soon to the U.S. Supreme Court. Marketplace's Scott Tong reports.

In Beirut - blues and celebrations

Feb 28, 2005
In Lebanon today, thousands of angry protestors demonstrated outside the parliament. They were demanding that the pro-Syrian prime minister and his cabinet resign. And then surprisingly - the government did just that. The shakeup comes two weeks after the assassination of a former Prime Minister. Rafiq Hariri was an opponent of Syria's occupation of Lebanon. But he was also a self-made billionaire. And he helped rebuild his country after a 15-year civil war. From Beirut, Kate Seeley reports on new fears of an economic meltdown.

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