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Selling the Mount Airy Lodge

Mar 4, 2005
In the market for a dozen crystal chandeliers? How about a bright red bathtub? Those are just some of the fairly schlocky items for sale this weekend in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania. As Aries Keck reports from WHYY in Philadelphia, the auction is to sell off the bits and pieces of the once-grand Mount Airy Lodge.

Meetings, and wasting time ...

Mar 3, 2005
Did I mention that new productivity number? Yeah, looks like I did. But I left out something. With the strong showing we heard about today, Americans set a new record. It's the strongest three years of productivity growth in more than a half century of record keeping. But people, we can do better. Yeah, let's do it!All-staff meeting in the big conference room! Our guest speaker is marketing expert Adam Hanft.

An after school alliance

Mar 3, 2005
Today lawmakers in the House and Senate launched a new, bi-partisan caucus. The purpose: to promote more afterschool programs in the U.S. And push for more federal dollars. As Work and Family correspondent Sarah Gardner reports, there'll be a lot of pushing uphill.

League for sale, National Hockey League for sale!

Mar 3, 2005
The 2004-2005 hockey season is officially off. But a private investment firm and a sports advisory company have reportedly made a joint proposal to buy all 30 National Hockey League teams for as much as $3.5 billion to bring the league back next year in a different form. Host David Brown talks to business of sports commentator Diana Nyad about what the bid would mean for the league.

Flu worries

Mar 3, 2005
For the last two days they've been planning for a disaster. Public health officials from all over Europe have been meeting in Luxembourg. The scenario they've been studying is one the World Health Organization warns is on its way. A flu pandemic. Of special concern: a bird flu which has re-emerged in Vietnam. Experts worry it could mutate into a highly dangerous human variety. That could cost millions of lives ... and billions of dollars. From the European Desk in London Stephen Beard reports.

Who you gonna call? Despanches!

Mar 3, 2005
You've been working very hard it seems. Today new productivity numbers. Up 2.1 percent in the last quarter of 2004. In the global productivity game, American business has a distinct advantage. For instance? On average, it's takes about three and a half hours to register a small business. In Peru, the same process would take almost 290 days. And in nearby Brazil, the red tape is so onerous, it's spawned a new profession. Meet the despachante! Marketplace's Dan Grech reports.

Meet the "moto-boys"

Mar 3, 2005
If you think traffic's bad where you are, you probably haven't been to Sao Paolo, Brazil. The city is a vast unplanned mess of 18 million people. It has some of the worst traffic congestion in the world. And it's more than just a headache for drivers. In Sao Paolo, traffic tie-ups account for an estimated $80 billion a year in lost productivity. Simply put - time is money. But as Americas desk correspondent Dan Grech reports, a small army of daredevils have emerged to keep the Brazilian economy chugging.

Happiness ...

Mar 3, 2005
Maybe your mother told you money doesn't buy happiness. But perhaps you don't believe it. Today, a visit with Lord Richard Layard, author of a new book called, simply, Happiness. He says even though our purchasing power has soared over the past fifty years, we're no happier than we were before.

Faith in forecasting?

Mar 3, 2005
The outlooks for Social Security and other government programs are based on a variety of economic projections. But are these long-range forecasts worth the paper they're written on? Host Kai Ryssdal gets some insight from Marketplace's money guru Chris Farrell about these numbers and how much faith we should put in them.

Investigating insurance

Mar 2, 2005
More bad news today for the insurance industry. There's word the New York Attorney General and the SEC are expanding an investigation. They want to know whether major insurers are using complex offshore deals to manipulate their earnings. Once again a familiar name is involved: AIG. It's this country's largest insurer and one of the most powerful financial institutions in the world. As Marketplace's Amy Scott reports, that may help explain why a series of scandals has barely left a dent in the company... so far.

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