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Better Homes, Chinese style

Jan 20, 2005
Quick: think of a magazine devoted to domesticity with a mainstream, middle-America sense of style. Better Homes and Gardens, perhaps? For more than one hundred years it's been published in Iowa. Apparently they've decided to expand their reach just a little bit. From WOI radio in Des Moines, Joyce Russell reports.

An expensive party

Jan 20, 2005
In Washington, this morning, thousands of uniformed officers are on duty and one hundred blocks of downtown D.C. are cordoned off. It's all part of today's inaugural festivities for President Bush. By all accounts, this will be the costliest and most secure inauguration ever. But who will get stuck with that security bill? Marketplace's Hillary Wicai has some answers.

Inaugural fashion

Jan 20, 2005
Who's she wearing? Who's she wearing? That's the question on every fashionista's lips today - and they're not talking about Julia Roberts or Hallie Berry. They're all waiting to see what Laura Bush wears to tonight's inaugural balls. We can tell you it's a grey-blue floor-length number from Oscar de la Renta. We turned to Washington Post fashion editor Robin Givhan for her take on what the inaugural means to the fashion industry...

Consumer savings

Jan 20, 2005
The government constantly urges us as Americans to save more money. But Marketplace's money expert Chris Farrell thinks those pleas are a bit overrated. He joins host Kai Ryssdal to explain why.

We're having a party ...

Jan 19, 2005
We know it's coming, the Constitution says so. But every four years Inauguration Day catches Washington like snow storm no one expected. Federal workers take the day off, while other companies and their employees fend for themselves. But this year a record number of roads will be closed for the president's big event. And the effects on commerce will be felt throughout the city. Marketplace's Scott Tong reports.

But - who goes to the party?

Jan 19, 2005
Security and today's snowstorm may have shut much of Washington down. But that doesn't mean there's nothing going on. Corporate and private donations have paid for $40 million worth of festivities this week. More than 50 companies made contributions of $250,000 each. People who gave $100,000 get to see the president take the oath of office in person. The rest of the money comes mainly from the tickets bought by parade watchers and ball-goers. But South Dakota Public Radio's Curt Nickisch discovered not all Republican Party loyalists can afford to go to the big dance.

When is a lawsuit, a lawsuit?

Jan 19, 2005
If a shareholder lawsuit was filed but no one collected the money, would it still be a case? A Texas law firm is suing more that 40 mutual fund managers over just that. The plaintiffs say the funds failed to collect some $2 billion on behalf of their investors. Marketplace's Amy Scott reports.

Special Report: No place to hide

Jan 19, 2005
Even as the Bush Administration went hunting for terrorists overseas after September 11th, the government was also looking for them here. One industry was more than ready to help. Data management companies had spent the decade before September 11th collecting billions of records about almost every American adult. In his new book, No Place to Hide, Robert O'Harrow looked into the data industry in this country and its new relationships with intelligence and law enforcement agencies. He worked with John Biewen from American RadioWorks on a companion documentary. In this report for Marketplace Beewin traces the transformation of a man named Hank Asher (pictured) from run-of-the-mill tech millionaire, to a player in the war on terror.

Suburban sprawl and safety

Jan 19, 2005
Today we get some numbers on housing starts - of course higher numbers are good for the economy. But they might also indicate suburban sprawl. We know over-building can strain schools and roads. Now one county in the Washington DC area is worrying about what happens when people dial 9-1-1. Marketplace's Scott Tong reports.

The Krispy Kreme blues

Jan 18, 2005
Krispy Kreme is facing an accounting investigation and shareholder lawsuits, and a possible default on a $150 million credit line. What to do? Today CEO Scott Livengood got dunked. In steps replacement Stephen Cooper. Mr. Cooper is no ordinary executive: he is what's know as a turnaround specialist. Norm Bartzak teaches at Columbia's Business and Law Schools, and he's been following the dough at Krispy Kreme...

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