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The Mouse's good old days

May 11, 2005
Walt Disney reports its quarterly results tomorrow, and is in the midst of celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Disneyland resort. Host David Brown talks to professor Steven Mintz about marketing nostalgia for Disney toys.

Cisco security

May 10, 2005
There was word today that a security breach at Cisco last year was far greater than initially thought. Reports now say it was part of a global hacking plot aimed at university and government data. Nice timing for a house panel to hold a hearing on computer security. It seems we're riding a wave of security breaches at the moment. But it's hard to say for sure. Marketplace's Lisa Napoli reports no one wants to talk about it. Unless they absolutely have to.

The $200 PC

May 10, 2005
A major technology announcement today from India. The government's teaming with a company called Encore to sell a new computer. The price tag: $200. These units are probably not coming soon to a Wal-Mart near you. And they don't do Windows. But as Miranda Kennedy reports from New Delhi, it may be just what millions of people have been waiting for.
Posted In: Canada

Immigrant healthcare

May 10, 2005
For years now, hospitals in border states have complained about the high cost of treating illegal immigrants. Now Washington's offering some relief. The Feds will put up $250 million dollars for the next four years. The money's supposed to help reimburse doctors and hospitals providing emergency treatment to undocumented aliens. But, as Helen Palmer reports from the Health Desk at WGBH, that's not nearly enough to cover actual costs.
Posted In: Canada

CAFTA in trouble

May 10, 2005
Leaders of five Central American countries, plus the Dominican Republic, are in Washington this week. They're trying to lobby U-S lawmakers to approve the Central American Free Trade Agreement. CAFTA, as it's called, is designed to lower quotas and tariffs. It's one of the Bush administration's top trade priorities this year. But as Marketplace's Hillary Wicai reports, the deal could be in trouble on Capitol Hill.
Posted In: Canada

Mississippi education

May 10, 2005
Former Netscape CEO Jim Barksdale has made an offer to his native Mississippi, one that might sound almost too good to pass up. Barksdale's promising to endow $50 million dollars in grants for Mississippi students...on one condition. The legislature has to fully fund the state's public schools. Mississippi currently ranks 49th in per pupil spending. But lawmakers adjourned last month without an education budget for the upcoming fiscal year. So where does this leave the 'Barksdale challenge'? From Marketplace's Work and Family Desk, Sarah Gardner reports.

Starbucks & libraries

May 9, 2005
McDonald's is lovin' it. The fast food giant said today its sales jumped 2.8% last month. Part of the reason--the new stronger coffee Mickey D's is dishing up for breakfast. Specialty coffee has also been a big draw for bookstore chains like Borders and Barnes & Noble. That's helped siphon business away from many libraries. But now some libraries on the outskirts of Chicago are taking a page out of that playbook. Borzou Daragahi reports:

"The Sloan Sessions": Junkyard dogs

May 9, 2005
GM and Ford's credit ratings are both listed as "junk status" now by Standard & Poor's. In this edition of The Sloan Sessions, host Kai Ryssdal talks to Newsweek's Wall Street editor Allan Sloan about what it means for the automakers and the challenges they face as they try to break free of the financial junkyard.

Guns for jobs, in Israel

May 9, 2005
Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas isn't taking guns away from militants, but he's offering an attractive incentive for them to put them down: jobs. From Ramallah, Nancy Updike reports.
Posted In: Canada

Iran and Rover

May 6, 2005
The bidding war for British car maker MG Rover got a little hotter this week. The government of Iran said it might make an offer to acquire the bankrupt company. Turns out, Iran already has a foot in the door. One of the country's automakers has held talks with Rover about building 150 thousand of its cars a year. Now it's not that Iran needs Rovers, per se. The government already manufacturers a very popular car called the Peykan. But as of the end of this month, it's headed for the scrap heap. Reporter Borzou Daragahi explains.
Posted In: Canada

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