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Life after two years of war in Iraq

Mar 18, 2005
Sunday marks the second anniversary of the start of the war on Iraq. For ordinary Iraqis, the war has meant dramatic changes... Both in their personal and economic lives. Borzou Daragahi reports from Baghdad.
Posted In: Canada

Reinventing Retirement: Wyoming sets the example

Mar 17, 2005
It begins in about five years. 76 million Americans are poised to join the pool of people known as retirees. More than half of that number will be out of the work force by 2013. But in one state, the future is now. And the rest of the nation might want to take note. In the second part of our series <A href="http://marketplace.publicradio.org/features/reinvent_retirement/">'reinventing retirement'</A>, special correspondent Jo Giese reports from Wyoming.

Stigma and AIDS, for Africa's women

Mar 17, 2005
Annie Lennox and the surviving members of Queen are among the names on the all-star lineup. It's a concert this Saturday in South Africa. Sponsored by the Nelson Mandela Foundation. The object is to raise money for the many women struggling with AIDS. On the African continent, women suffer the brunt of the pandemic. But getting women to ask for treatment is difficult. Stigma is still a huge issue. From Botswana, Gretchen Wilson reports on how they've turned a challenge...into a competition.
Posted In: Canada

Special Report: Reinventing retirement

Mar 16, 2005
Investing in bonds used to be considered a solid retirement strategy. Not so simple anymore. Then again, neither is the definition of 'retirement'... We've been warned about a wave of retirees, as the boomers leave the workforce. And there've been all sorts of predictions about how this might play out. Perhaps it's time to go beyond mere predictions. Reporter Jo Giese sensed the reinvention of retirement is already underway. So she took her gear and travelled to a state where there's been a sudden influx of retirees. A place where you probably won't have much use for shuffleboard sticks.

Brazil pushes genetically modified seeds for farmers

Mar 16, 2005
In the next couple of weeks Brazil is expected to do something few thought it ever would. Its expected to give the ok to genetically modified seeds. This means Brazilian farmers would spend less on pesticides... grow more crops per acre... and perhaps be a more formidable competitor to American farmers. So why are some U.S. farmers embracing the change in Brazil? From the Marketplace Americas Desk at WLRN, Dan Gretch reports.
Posted In: Canada

UK plans 50 year bond. Will U.S. follow suit?

Mar 16, 2005
Would you be willing to lend some cash, for say, 50 years? If so, the British government would like to hear from you. Today the UK's finance chief announced plans for a fifty-year bond. These long-term borrowings are fast becoming a must-have accessory for European governments. And with America's budget deficit, you've got to wonder whether the idea might have some appeal on this side of the Atlantic. Marketplace's Stephen Beard reports.
Posted In: Canada

Soccer dream team Real Madrid kicks short

Mar 15, 2005
$250 million. That's how much it cost to assemble the greatest team in the history of soccer. After all, when you sign players like David Beckham, what do you expect? More than two straight losing seasons, that's for sure. The president of Spain's star-studded soccer team is ready for a change. Real Madrid will sell off the marquee talent and put the money into making a winner. Marketplace's European Bureau Chief Steven Beard reports.
Posted In: Canada

India's call centers battle burnout

Mar 15, 2005
Feel overworked and stressed out? Angry at your employer, perhaps? If so, you fit the profile. There's a new study out today from the Families and Work Institute. They surveyed workers in the U.S. Survey says? About a third feel overworked. Nearly a quarter of them are also clinically depressed. As more American jobs are outsourced, companies may be spreading something else. From New Delhi, Miranda Kennedy reports on a growing burnout factor.
Posted In: Canada

Reshaping the American labor movement

Mar 15, 2005
The American labor movement - losing membership and political clout - is trying to re-tool to become more relevant for modern workers. Union leaders have targeted the fastest growing segment of the labor force - professional and technical workers. But traditional unions have not kept pace with the changing nature of white collar work with the new world of contracting and outsourcing and temporary projects. John Dimsdale reports unions are being told they must change... or die.

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