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Having Children in China

Jun 1, 2005
Today is Children's Day in China. Due to worries about who will support the graying population, some cities have started allowing couples who are both only children to have two kids. But after 25 years of encouraging couples to have just one child, they're finding it's not that easy to turn back the clock. In Shanghai, the local-born population has been shrinking faster than anywhere else in China.
Posted In: Canada

Drug companies under fire

Jun 1, 2005
A congressional study released today blasts drug companies and the agency that regulates them. The report says the pharmaceutical industry is abusing the system for quick approval of new medications; John Dimsdale reports from Washington.

Bump in the road for Prius

Jun 1, 2005
The federal government is checking out 33 complaints that the 2004 and 2005 Prius models shut down when driven between 35 and 65 mph. Dennis Simanaitis with <i>Road and Track Magazine</i> says finding the problem will be like a high-tech detective game given the complexity of the gas-electric hybrid.

Looking for cover in Florida

Jun 1, 2005
It's been six months since hurricanes slammed Central Florida. Now as hurricane season starts again, some residents are still scrambling for cover. It all has to do with supply and demand. Robin Sussingham reports.

New shredding mandate

Jun 1, 2005
A new law goes into effect today that requires businesses to destroy (once they've used it) any consumer information they've gotten from credit reports. The idea is to make personal information disappear before identity thieves can get their hands on it. Ashley Milne-Tyte reports that not everyone knows about the Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act &#151; but ignorance is no defense.

World Poverty

May 31, 2005
The one-time Boomtown Rat who organized the Live Aid concert in the 80's is back at it. Today Bob Geldof announced plans for 5 concerts around the world on July 8th. This time, he says, they don't want money for famine relief. In fact they're not asking for money at all. Instead, he says, they want to influence the Group of 8 industrialized nations. They want to pressure world leaders to eradicate poverty in Africa. Idealistic? Perhaps. But according to Columbia University economist Jeffrey Sachs, the elimination of poverty is not an unrealistic goal. In a new book, Sachs claims global poverty can be eliminated in 20 years. 20 years?
Posted In: Canada

Brazil Intellectual Property

May 31, 2005
When people talk trade war, the battle of behemoths like Boeing and Airbus get most of the ink. But there is another, lower profile scrimmage going with big implications. This one involves multinational companies that refuse to share vital information with local governments. Developing nations complain that puts their economies and their citizens at risk. Today, the story of one developing nation that's decided to go beyond 'complaining'. From the Americas Desk in WLRN in Miami, Dan Grech reports on how Brazil is fighting back.
Posted In: Canada

Ranking cities

May 31, 2005
Atlanta is apparently the worst place in the country to be if you're worried about identity theft. That's according to the June issue of Men's Health magazine. But another new study finds Atlanta has the best road pavement conditions. There seems to be a constant stream of lists ranking cities on this or that. And various city leaders have mixed feelings about them. Mhari Saito reports from Cleveland, which somehow winds up near the bottom of many of those lists.

Iraq stock exchange

May 31, 2005
Even as parts of Iraq are still chaotic at best, officials there are doing the best they can to get on with the business of running a country. They've passed a law that allows foreigners to invest in Iraq's upstart stock market. And they're still trying to figure out the rules. Borzou Daragahi spent a day on the trading floor.
Posted In: Canada

G-E in India

May 30, 2005
The way people talk about it, it's as if outsourcing to India is something new. General Electric discovered it decades ago. Late last week, GE chief executive Jeffrey Immelt visited the company's facilities in India. He said he expects revenues there to climb more than 500% in the next five years. But as locals are learning, what's good for G-E is not necessarily good for India.Miranda Kennedy reports.
Posted In: Canada

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