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What do you do when gas goes up?

Sep 7, 2005
Scott Jagow talks to Gen Giuliano, professor at the University of Southern California's School of Policy, Planning and Development, about consumer responses to rising gas prices.

To czar or not to czar

Sep 7, 2005
Early estimates say recovery efforts will cost the federal government are more than $100 billion. Some are calling for a recovery czar to coordinate the massive effort. Scott Tong reports.

Seafood hit by Katrina

Sep 7, 2005
Entire industries have been devastated by Hurricane Katrina. One, seafood, was a mainstay of the economies of Louisiana and Mississippi. Rachel Dornhelm reports that those states are feeling the pain.

Supply books, create readers

Sep 7, 2005
In his offices in Amherst, Massahusetts, David Mazor has 2,000 textbooks wrapped up and ready to go to schoolkids displaced by Hurricane Katrina. He tells Lisa Napoli that his nonprofit has a thing for libraries.

Survivor: Waveland

Sep 6, 2005
Waveland, Mississippi, is right on the Gulf of Mexico. 7,000 people lived there — until Hurricane Katrina hit. Almost the only building still standing is the Coast Inn and Suites; Dan Grech reports on the new society there.

The Senate Energy Committee starts asking questions

Sep 6, 2005
Congress, in its first full day back at work since July, wants to talk energy. Members of the Senate Energy Committee, like Pete Domenici, want to know why gas prices are hovering so high. John Dimsdale reports.

Remember your zinc

Sep 6, 2005
Hurricane Katrina been leaving its mark on the price of oil — and other commodities, too. Prices for everything from zinc and copper to coffee and sugar have been rising. Business Editor Cheryl Glaser reports.

Foreign Aid — incoming

Sep 6, 2005
In all, more than 90 countries — a dozen of then from the European Union — have responded to the U.S. appeal for emergency aid to help victims of Hurricane Katrina. Stephen Beard reports.

"Illicit, unethical, corrupt"

Sep 6, 2005
Former Fed Chairman Paul Volcker has spent the past year looking into the UN's Oil for Food program. Today Volcker's team described corruption and failure of leadership that leads straight to the top. Amy Scott reports.

Keeping New Orleans running, just a little

Sep 6, 2005
Regular life is getting marginally better in New Orleans. Pumps are getting some of the flood water out and Mayor Ray Nagin said he's begining to see rays of light. Host Kai Ryssdal talks to Mira Oberman.

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