World - Most Recent

Pages

Israeli government collapse

Nov 21, 2005
Hillary Krieger reports on the collapse of the government in Israel. And this time, elections to choose a new one will focus more on economic issues than national security.

What ever happened to not insulting your host?

Nov 18, 2005
The president, who lands in China tomorrow, criticized the Chinese government in a speech on Wednesday. Kai Ryssdal asked Beijing bureau chief Jocelyn Ford about the speech... and the Chinese response to it.

Keeping track of Washington's pennies

Nov 18, 2005
Whose unenviable job is it to keep track of what the government is doing with its money? His name is David Walker, and Kai Ryssdal asked him to explain how things are going, fiscally speaking.

Bush in China

Nov 18, 2005
President Bush arrives in China tomorrow, and Ruth Kirchner looks at how the trip is being viewed from the Chinese perspective.

Bush in China - but wait, there's more!

Nov 18, 2005
President Bush arrives in Beijing tomorrow for a visit with China's leaders. Jocelyn Ford looks at what China wants out of Bush economically.

Earthquake donors conference

Nov 18, 2005
The UN is set to host a donors' conference in Islamabad, Pakistan, tomorrow in the wake of calls for more money to stop the unfolding humanitarian crisis in the aftermath of the South Asia earthquake. Miranda Kennedy reports.

Safety dance

Nov 17, 2005
European researchers are testing many household chemicals that have been used for years, to see whether they cause health problems. The testing, approved by the European Parliament, could have a big impact on American companies and consumers. Stephen Beard reports.

Free trade free-for-all

Nov 17, 2005
The Wall Street Journal says U.S. officials are alarmed that China seems to be buying influence with its extensive free-trade push. But Bob Moon reports the problem might be less with China... than with ourselves.

What does US business want from China?

Nov 16, 2005
The president is expected to call for China to revalue its currency. But many US business leaders hope he'll push for other policies, like opening more markets to American companies. Kai Ryssdal spoke to China expert Ted Fishman.

A day without China

Nov 16, 2005
A quarter of everything we import comes from China, most of it consumer goods. To see just how much a part of our daily lives China's goods are, we decided to try and spend a day without them. Alisa Roth has more from New York.

Pages

Support Marketplace