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India's newest challenge

Dec 7, 2004
Intel recently announced it's investing $40 million to add facilities in the Southern Indian City of Bangalore. India's high-tech capital, Bangalore has become the hub of India's IT services economy. Two to three western companies now start operations in the city every week. But the government hasn't revamped the city's infrastructure fast enough to keep pace with its growth. Miranda Kennedy looks at whether this problem will impede India's plans to become a global business center.

Tort reform - revisited

Dec 6, 2004
Members of Congress returned to Washington today, after a break for Thanksgiving. They've already made a deal toward revamping the country's intelligence apparatus. And the House is planning to wrap up work on a $388 billion spending bill. There's already a lot of talk about Social Security and tax reform--priorities for the next Congress. At a time when money issues are taking center stage, commentator and economist Glenn Hubbard worries about one issue getting sidetracked.

Partnerships for the future?

Dec 6, 2004
A major international airport wants to expand, with all the smog and noise that comes with it. What would you think if I told you that local grassroots activists are working together with airport officials to win approval of the expansion? Robin Urevich reports on an unusual partnership announced today... one that could signal a trend.

Fox and Clear Channel cut a deal

Dec 6, 2004
Fox News likes to say "We Report, You Decide". So, what do you make of this? The cable network has signed a deal with the country's largest chain of radio stations to provide national news for most of the news and talk outlets operated by Clear Channel Communications. A pairing made in heaven? Marketplace's Bob Moon reports.

Boeing and a new strategy

Dec 6, 2004
U.S. and European negotiators began trade talks today. Among the issues on the table - airplane builders. America's Boeing and Europe's Airbus accuse each other of unfairly using subsidies to win contracts. Just this year Airbus became the world's biggest aircraft maker. But Boeing is banking on a comeback with its new 7E7 Dreamliner. The plane is 20 percent more fuel efficient and 'relatively' cheap at $120 million. And Boeing has a strategy to convince foreigners to buy the plane...by inviting them to help build it. From Tokyo, Marketplace's Jessica Smith reports.
Posted In: Canada

Doing the cabinet shuffle

Dec 6, 2004
Newsweek Wall Street Editor Allan Sloan talks with Kai Ryssdal about how President Bush is spinning recent Cabinet replacements to possibly cover up policies gone awry.

A season after all?

Dec 6, 2004
Hockey fans are treading lightly this week, hoping against hope the lockout may come to an end before the season ends. Both sides meet this week after months of icy silence. In the meantime, minor league teams are doing what they can to bridge the gap. From KPCC in Los Angeles, Rachael Myrow reports.

Ukraine's unusual business boost

Dec 3, 2004
Above Kiev, fireworks tonight after Ukraine's Supreme Court declared the results of the recent presidential elections invalid. The court ordered another round of balloting on December 26th. The news electrified tens of thousands of supporters gathered at the square in support of opposition leader Viktor Yushchenko. His backers have been camped there since the November 21st elections, a protest of what they called widespread fraud. Though the demonstrations have hurt some sectors of Ukraine's economy, it has boosted others. From Kiev, Alex Kleimenov reports.
Posted In: Canada

The week on Wall Street

Dec 3, 2004
Host David Brown catches up with Dallas stockbroker and analyst David Johnson to talk about the big stories of the week that was... on Wall Street.

Going after the bad guys

Dec 3, 2004
You may have heard that the BBC had to apologize to Dow Chemical today. Its international TV news channel broadcast an interview with a Dow spokesman who took responsibility for the deadly industrial accident in Bhopal India 20 years ago today. The spokesman turned out to be a fake. The BBC says it was the victim of an elaborate deception. It now appears the hoaxer may be part of a group called the "Yes Men." They stage elaborate deceptions as a form of protest against corporatism. In the real world - no one has ever faced trial over the deaths of 3,500 people at the Bhopal factory owned by Union Carbide, now a Dow subsidiary. But this coming Monday that could start to change, says commentator and writer Mark Hertsgaard.

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