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Airlines & competition

May 18, 2005
Business travelers are taking a harder look at the bottom line when they fly. That's forced airlines to cut costs. But one place they're not trimming back are the posh travelers' clubs at airports. Curt Nickish explains why. Then, airline cost cutting has left some empty gates at airports. And as Marketplace's Savvy Traveler Rudy Maxa tells us, that's led to more competition... and lower fares.

Think Global: Ethics

May 18, 2005
American businesses can pledge to behave ethically. But when they have an office in a country in different laws and customs, doing the right thing isn't always so clear-cut. Marketplace's Bob Moon gives us some examples in this installment of the Public Radio series, "Think Global."
Posted In: Canada

Global misfits

May 17, 2005
In China, multinational companies are scrambling to hire Chinese nationals who've studied overseas or worked in foreign offices. Beijing Bureau Chief Jocelyn Ford reports globalization is forcing foreign companies to adopt both the good -- and bad -- of American business practices.
Posted In: Canada

Midwest land grab

May 17, 2005
A century and a half ago, the Homestead Act used the promise of free land to lure settlers to the Great Plains. Now descendants of those settlers are leaving the region in droves. So, some towns in the region are trying to reverse depopulation with, once again, free land. Curt Nickisch reports from the town of Crosby in remote North Dakota.

Marketplace letters for May 17, 2005

May 17, 2005
Host David Brown dips into the Marketplace mailbag. What are listeners responding to?

Phoenix forest

May 17, 2005
When the Mt. St. Helen's volcano erupted 25 years ago tomorrow, one of Washington State's most valuable timber properties became a pile of dust. Now, the tree harvesting business there is not only rising from the ashes, it's coming back stronger than ever. Tom Banse reports.

Standing out in India

May 17, 2005
This week in our contribution to the public radio series "Think Global," we're looking at how countries around the world are adopting America's business practices. In this morning's installment, we look at a company in India that's going way beyond the American way of doing business.
Posted In: Canada

Khodorkovsky guilty

May 16, 2005
Once upon a time, Mikhail Khodorkovsky was Russia's wealthiest entrepreneur. Now the oil tycoon could face up to ten years in jail after being found guilty of fraud today. Khodorkovsky was the poster boy for Russia's "oligarchs"--businesspeople who made millions by snapping up former state-run companies on the cheap. Reporter Simon Marks looks at the impact today's conviction could have on Russia's business climate:
Posted In: Canada

Inventors Hall of Fame

May 16, 2005
What do Valium, the steam locomotive, and frozen food all have in common? Answer--their inventors were inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in Akron, Ohio this past weekend. The Hall of Fame was created more than 30 years ago. It's the brainchild of the U-S Patent & Trademark Office and the National Council of Intellectual Property Law Association. Fred Allen is head of the Hall of Fame's selection committee. We asked him what it takes to make the grade and get inducted:

Think Global: Bio-prospecting

May 16, 2005
You're gonna hear a lot about the G-word this week, thanks to a public radio series called "Think Global"--looking at globalization and its effects. Here at Marketplace, we're focusing on one particular trend--how America tries to export its way of doing business. Many U-S firms want international companies to follow their lead, in everything from corporate ethics to office culture. But the transfer of ideas isn't always easy, even where there's lots of money at stake. For example--an ambitious effort by U-S biotech companies in Mexico didn't take into account how people there think about medicine--and money. Reporter Mary Stucky explains:
Posted In: Canada

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