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Mississippi education

May 10, 2005
Former Netscape CEO Jim Barksdale has made an offer to his native Mississippi, one that might sound almost too good to pass up. Barksdale's promising to endow $50 million dollars in grants for Mississippi students...on one condition. The legislature has to fully fund the state's public schools. Mississippi currently ranks 49th in per pupil spending. But lawmakers adjourned last month without an education budget for the upcoming fiscal year. So where does this leave the 'Barksdale challenge'? From Marketplace's Work and Family Desk, Sarah Gardner reports.

Starbucks & libraries

May 9, 2005
McDonald's is lovin' it. The fast food giant said today its sales jumped 2.8% last month. Part of the reason--the new stronger coffee Mickey D's is dishing up for breakfast. Specialty coffee has also been a big draw for bookstore chains like Borders and Barnes & Noble. That's helped siphon business away from many libraries. But now some libraries on the outskirts of Chicago are taking a page out of that playbook. Borzou Daragahi reports:

"The Sloan Sessions": Junkyard dogs

May 9, 2005
GM and Ford's credit ratings are both listed as "junk status" now by Standard & Poor's. In this edition of The Sloan Sessions, host Kai Ryssdal talks to Newsweek's Wall Street editor Allan Sloan about what it means for the automakers and the challenges they face as they try to break free of the financial junkyard.

Guns for jobs, in Israel

May 9, 2005
Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas isn't taking guns away from militants, but he's offering an attractive incentive for them to put them down: jobs. From Ramallah, Nancy Updike reports.
Posted In: Canada

Iran and Rover

May 6, 2005
The bidding war for British car maker MG Rover got a little hotter this week. The government of Iran said it might make an offer to acquire the bankrupt company. Turns out, Iran already has a foot in the door. One of the country's automakers has held talks with Rover about building 150 thousand of its cars a year. Now it's not that Iran needs Rovers, per se. The government already manufacturers a very popular car called the Peykan. But as of the end of this month, it's headed for the scrap heap. Reporter Borzou Daragahi explains.
Posted In: Canada

Unemployment in Germany

May 6, 2005
The White House's reaction to today's employment numbers - way to go! Or words to that effect. Treasury Secretary John Snow said we can expect more new jobs moving forward, thanks to what he called the underlying strength of the economy. Still the unemployment rate remains stuck at 5.2%. That's not so bad, though, compared to what's going on in Germany. Unemployment there is running at about 12%, the highest since World War II. A new website aims to match up would-be workers with jobs - but at a price. From Berlin, Kyle James has the story.
Posted In: Canada

Gloversville awake

May 6, 2005
The Defense Department requires that military supplies be made in the U.S. That can be a big challenge for producers of some products who've shipped their manufacturing operations overseas. Reporter Jordana Gustafson has a story of what one company did, reawakening one small town's former economy in the process.

Kentucky Derby

May 6, 2005
Are folks really interested in watching the ponies at the Kentucky Derby, or do they just want to pony up to the winnings? Host Kai Ryssdal talks to Marketplace's Business of Sports commentator Diana Nyad about what really keeps the sport of kings running.

Holocaust fund

May 5, 2005
Today is Holocaust Remembrance Day. Ceremonies are taking place around the world to pay tribute to the millions of people killed by the Nazis. One of those events was held at Israel's Yaad Vashem holocaust museum, which recently re-opened after a $40 million dollar renovation. At the same time, death camp survivors in Israel are finding their financial safety net is getting a little threadbare. Nancy Updike looks at how things got so bad:
Posted In: Canada

Trailer voice-overs

May 5, 2005
Tonight in LA there's a big shindig being held at the Kodak Theater. It's a sort of Oscars of the movie marketing industry. And the people who make movie trailers will be competing in drama, comedy, and action categories. But almost every one of those movie ads will have something in common... the deep sonorous tones of a male voice. We asked the velvet-voiced Ashley Milne-Tyte to find out why:

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