Raising the Debt Ceiling - Most Commented

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The details of the latest debt ceiling plans

Jul 18, 2011
There are a lot of different debt ceiling plans in progress right now in Washington, but will any get through before the Aug. 2nd deadline?

Wall Street's counter intuitive reaction to the debt talks

Jul 15, 2011
Chris Low, chief economist with FTN Financial, explains why investors aren't scared of U.S. debt despite real worries of a default.
Posted In: Wall Street

Wall Street versus Main Street reaction to debt ceiling debate

Jul 15, 2011
Jill Schlesinger, editor-at-large at CBS/MoneyWatch, says people are reacting differently to this week's debt talks, and looks ahead to what could happen should politicians fail to settle the debates.

Debt talks: Are we ready for Plan C?

Jul 15, 2011
President Obama told lawmakers that "it's decision time" for the ongoing debt talks. But is there an actual deal within reach?

Credit agencies heighten warning on U.S. debt

Jul 14, 2011
As politicians quarrel over a deal to raise the debt limit, Moody's joins Standard & Poor's in warning it might cut the U.S. credit rating.

The debt talks: Democrats, Republicans and you

Jul 11, 2011
The latest in the political discourse concerning the debt ceiling, and what people on the streets are saying.

The difference between a $2 trillion and a $4 trillion deficit cut

Jul 11, 2011
Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody's Analytics, explains the political differences between the two options for deficit cutting, and what it would mean to miss the August 2 deadline.

Deadlocked debt talks may move past 'grand bargains'

Jul 11, 2011
The national debt debates halted over the weekend as Congressional Democrats and Republicans reached a stalemate over tax cuts. As the deadline for a solution approaches, are investors getting nervous?

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About this collection

A near billion dollar company, World Finance is the largest of an often-overlooked breed of high-cost lender: installment lenders. Ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars, the loans typically last anywhere from six months to three years. The industry boasts millions of customers and over 4,000 locations across at least 19 states, mostly in the south and Midwest, and touts the product as a consumer-friendly alternative to payday loans. World and its competitors gouge borrowers with unnecessary insurance products and persuade their customers to renew their loans over and over again, creating a cycle of debt that often grinds on for years.