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2012: Reviewing the year of the super PAC

Dec 25, 2012
Super PACs spent big money on the 2012 election. But some of the biggest donors didn't exactly get a good rate of return. So, can we expect more big spending the next election cycle?
Posted In: Election 2012, super PACs

Bad day for billionaires

Nov 7, 2012
Conservative super donors fared poorly on Election Day
Posted In: Election 2012, super PACs, Barack Obama, Mitt Romney

Last-minute outside spending favors Romney

Nov 6, 2012
Outside spending burst closes campaign
Posted In: 2012 elections, Barack Obama, Mitt Romney

Obama slammed by attack ads in final weekend of campaign

Nov 5, 2012
Outside spending the weekend before Election Day tops $73 million
Posted In: 2012 election, super PACs, Barack Obama, Mitt Romney

Bloomberg’s super PAC backs candidates in both parties

Nov 1, 2012
Super PAC founded by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg spends nearly $5 million in California, Florida, and Illinois.
Posted In: super PACs, 2012 election, Michael Bloomberg

Super PACs aim to spook voters with Halloween ads

Oct 31, 2012
Negative ads with a Halloween twist hit the airwaves
Posted In: 2012 elections, super PACs, Halloween

Tennessee congressman targeted in ads over alleged affair

Oct 30, 2012
Rep. Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee is the subject of a pro-Democrat super PAC ad.

Chevron-powered super PAC helps Ohio Congressman

Oct 29, 2012
An Ohio seat for U.S. House of Representatives is targeted by conservative super PAC that received $2.5 million from Chevron.
Posted In: super PAC, Ohio

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About this collection

Food stamps turns 50 this year.  Since the program was written in to law, it's become one of those government programs that gets a lot of attention from politicians on both the left and the right -- especially recently.  The program has been growing furiously in the last 15 years -- one in seven Americans is on food stamps today. That's more than twice what the rate was in 2000.  Some of that can be explained by changing eligibility requirements and job-losses during the recession. But the fastest growing group of food stamp participants in the last few decades are people who have jobs and work full year-round.  And that suggests a deeper new reality. Even once the recession is fully behind us, could increased use of food stamps driven by low-wage jobs be a permanent fixture of the American economy?