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Why the Fed's actions are hurting markets

We're reading a number of stories about the effect that an expected slowdown in the Federal Reserve's bond-buying program is having on emerging markets. They're all missing a central explainer of why these markets are hurting.

Here's my take:

The Fed's program pumped lots of cheap cash into the system - call it a bond-buying, stimulus or liquidity program. A lot of people used that cheap cash to invest in emerging markets.

And as investors anticipate the Fed putting the brakes on the program, two things are happening simultaneously.

  1. Investors figure there'll be less cheap money coming out of the Fed, which means there'll less money going in to so-called emerging markets. That will cause a slowdown in economies like Indonesia and India. And no-one wants to have their money in an economy that's slowing down. So investors are pulling their money out.
  2. Investors are nervous the entire financial system will slow down with less cheap money, so they’re piling back into safe stuff –- which means they're moving even more cash out of emerging markets and into safer, U.S. investments.

Together these actions translate to one big flight of cash away from emerging markets. And while no-one is in big trouble yet, we're already seeing the effects of this so-called flight of capital.

An analogy: Imagine you're living a high-flying, American Express Gold Card executive lifestyle. You use your big paycheck to buy a big car and a big mortgage and send your kids to Ivy League schools, and you amass big credit card bills, that you are having no problem paying off.

And then one day your boss comes into your office and tells you revenues are down at the firm and everyone's income is going to be cut in half -- including yours. Suddenly you're going to have problems paying your mortgage, your credit card bills and your kids' tuition. You may even have trouble fueling your car and feeding your family.

That's how those emerging nations feel.


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Aug 20, 2013

The down-low on Fannie and Freddie

As we reported today about President Obama's speech in Phoenix on the housing market, and specifically on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, we realized there's a lot of conflicting information out there about how much of the mortgage market Fannie and Freddie are actually responsible for.

Some say just 50 percent; others say as much as 90 percent.

The New York Times quoted an Obama Administration official saying , "the government guarantees more than 80 percent of all mortgages through Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and F.H.A."

So what's going on here?

I got a clear answer from Edward J. Pinto of the American Enterprise Institute. Pinto used to work as the chief credit officer  at Fannie Mae, and he keeps a close eye on his former employer. He says people often conflate Fannie and Freddie with other government agencies, such as the Federal Housing Administration, the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Agriculture.

Pinto says if you look at the agencies separately, of all the mortgages outstanding in the market right now, Fannie and Freddie are responsible for about 55 percent, other government agencies are responsible for about 15 percent, and the private label market is responsible for the remainder. 

Pretty simple, math, it seems. (Thanks, Ed!)


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Aug 6, 2013

SAC insider trading charges, explained

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The criminal indictment of SAC Capital is all about the misuse of material of non-public information ... otherwise known as insider trading.

Fabrice Tourre's trial: The fabulous translation

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So what is LIBOR, exactly?

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Posted In: China, Banks, credit crunch

Kids' crazy sports costs offer tax perks

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A listener responds to our conversation about expensive sports programs for kids.
Posted In: Taxes, consumed, sustainability

Bernanke's tape: Who's afraid of rising rates?

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Fed chair Ben Bernanke says rising interest rates are a good thing. But good for whom, exactly?
Posted In: QE2, Bernanke, taper

Opportunity cost: A simple Whiteboard explainer

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Economists love to use the term "opportunity cost." In fact, you've probably heard it before. But what is it exactly? Senior producer and Whiteboard expert Paddy Hirsch explains.
Posted In: opportunity, opportunity cost, consumer

About face on the home front: Interest rates spike

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For a moment there, things were looking really peachy in housing.
Posted In: mortgage, interest rates, bonds, Ben Bernanke

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About this collection

2010 was a roller-coaster year for health care reform; stories of hot congressional debates and angry protests swept the media in the months leading up to President Obama's historic signing of the approved health care bill. With the reform becoming law comes a host of questions: How can we better understand our new health care plan? How will we be affected by changes to our health insurance? What are the most important things to know about the health care law? Marketplace continues to follow the story.