Neighborhood Photo Project - Most Recent

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Monica Pollard | Nampa, Idaho

Nampa is the second largest urban area in Idaho, about 20 miles west of Boise. The old downtown of Nampa was built ca. 1880's-early 1900's, with lots of old-west style brick buildings. Many small privately-owned shops there closed in the past 3-4 years. They weren't well-supported by consumers and the rents are unrealistically high. At the same time, new commercial shopping areas were being built, which we didn't see a need for. It was announced this month there's going to be a third Walmart in Nampa. This is a snowy morning in December 2008, looking south down our street. The Snake River is about 12 miles south. We live outside the city limits in a mixed area of older large lots and small newer subdivisions. I like it because of the snow, the early morning sky, and the lights on the houses. It's western open spaces and coziness combined. And it doesn't show the more modern development to the north of us.

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Mar 1, 2012

Greg Lundell | Redwood City, Calif.

Redwood City is an old town by Northern California standards. It has big trees and wide streets. There is a nicely developed downtown where the swanky "gastro-pubs" probably outnumber the liquor stores. The city also has an extraordinary divide between wealthy and poor. Multi-million dollar homes are only blocks away from high density housing. The population ranges from well established (generally more wealthy) families to immigrant families that seem to be right on the edge of poverty. There is literally a Ferrari dealership a third of a mile down the street from a market that has no name apart from advertising that it accepts food stamps. The amazing thing is that nobody seems all that shocked by it; people have to buy food and gotta have Ferraris.

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Mar 1, 2012

Kerry McMahon | Baltimore, Md.

We live in Ridgely's Delight, one of the few city neighborhoods that has trees. It makes us unique. The spring blossoms seem to be a chance at renewal. They bring everyone back to life. Being able to live in the city - which can often be depressing - but also having a chance to enjoy nature, balances everything out.

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Mar 1, 2012

Linda Hall | Evanston, Ill.

I chose this photo because to me it symbolizes the changes in my neighborhood and in my life. In 2009, I had just lost my job and knew that I needed to get my chimney relined. That combined with getting doors made for the front was going to cost over $7,000. Instead I opted to convert to a wood burning stove for less than half the price. It's more practical, less expensive and more environmentally sound. When I'm home on cold days I can run the stove and not run my furnace. The papers in front of the fireplace were my study aids that helped me pass the exam to become a certified Project Management Professional -- a class I took through the Workforce Improvement Act. Everyone I know is cutting back and many people are looking to improve and expand their skill sets in the hope that knowing more will make them more attractive both personally and professionally.

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Mar 1, 2012

Cathleen McCann | Avondale, Ariz.

There are still many agricultural areas here -- many individuals reliant on the weather, soil, and other conditions out of their control.

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Mar 1, 2012

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About this collection

The Neighborhood Photo Project is a collaboration of Marketplace's Wealth and Poverty Desk and the Public Insight Network.