Neighborhood Photo Project - Most Commented

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Mike Langer | Boise, Idaho

This is my wife and I overlooking Boise, Idaho. Our lives for the past four years have been shaped by the beauties and difficulties of this wonderful city.My wife and I live in Boise, Idaho. The economy has been rough as long as we've lived here. We moved from Bismarck, ND, which has had one of the best economies during the Great Recession. We moved here in August 2008 for my Masters degree in Piano Performance at Boise State University.

I left a church music job in Bismarck which paid $28,000 to get my Masters. Kicking myself now. Last month I decided to try the Doctor of Musical Arts route again so I auditioned at the University of Utah. I'm still waiting to hear back. If accepted, we plan to move to Salt Lake City and strike out a new living. If not, we're going to try to make something work out in Bismarck, where all of our family lives. Boise doesn't seem to be improving, and we're dangerously close to the edge.


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Mar 5, 2012

Daniel Bevan | Brooklyn, N.Y.

I chose this photo because there is nothing more New York than a slice of pizza and it's a good one. There is always a line (except for this rainy night) and it's a very representative cross-section of the neighborhood. Who doesn't like pizza?

To me it has been a warm and satisfying meal especially when a couple of dollars was all I could afford. I enjoy the shoulder to shoulder camaraderie while waiting for a slice. The gentlemen who serve the deliciousness speak Spanish not Italian and they are grace in motion wielding those big wooden pizza peels and wheels. They do it with a smile on there face too.


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Mar 5, 2012

George Judson | Pasadena, Calif.

I'm the managing editor of Marketplace. We live on the edge of a historic, even grand neighborhood in Pasadena. Our house is modest. The front porch looks out on apartments on the next street. Police helicopters are frequently overhead -- it's L.A. We watch the alley behind us for graffiti, dumped mattresses, other signs of stress. But it's a friendly, tight neighborhood.


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Mar 5, 2012

Bob Samuels | Webb City, Mo.

I live in a mostly rural subdivision outside of the Joplin, Mo. area. The community is still rebuilding from the May tornadoes. There is a large area of FEMA housing and much construction in the affected areas. My particular neighborhood seems to be doing well economically but we live in a generally depressed economic area.


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Mar 5, 2012

Bev Kraker | Ann Arbor, Mich.

You can see what an ethnically diverse group of neighbors we are. This makes for a great potluck! We like to engage with each other so we have a sense of "family" and we lookout for each other. When the big "black out" happened a few years ago one of the neighbors hosted the rest of us in his backyard for an impromptu ice cream social. We have goodbye parties and welcome to the neighborhood parties.


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Mar 5, 2012

Tim Bomba | Culver City, Calif.

Two industries that span decades of growth for Culver City, Calif., as seen from one hilltop. Oil rigs, and movies/TV. Sometimes overlapping. In the left photo, the building in the oil fields has been used for TV and film scenes. A few miles away, the white buildings center in the distance, on the right photo, with the water tower, are Sony Pictures Entertainment Studios, in addition to a number of independent film sound stages and production companies.


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Mar 5, 2012

Christine MacLean | Holland, Mich.

First of all, it's not my photo. It's Mary Hilldore's, but she's another member of our 'hood and she gave me permission to use it. I choose it because it shows a mix of ages having fun together. It shows our sense of community. I live in Holland, Michigan's Historic District, which is adjacent to downtown. Greater Holland is socially and politically conservative; it's still legal to discriminate against people who are gay, if you can believe it. But right in our little 'hood, there's a greater mix of liberal and conservative views. We chose this neighborhood for that reason and because we could walk to downtown and to school and (most of us) even work to work. When the school board announced in 2004 they were closing our neighborhood school, a group of families banded together and fought it hard. We lost, but we bonded during that time, forming a community that functions as an extended family. We look out for each others' kids, share resources, organize meals when someone has had surgery, cover for each other and offer frequent words of encouragement and reassurance.


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Mar 5, 2012

Greg Lundell | Redwood City, Calif.

Redwood City is an old town by Northern California standards. It has big trees and wide streets. There is a nicely developed downtown where the swanky "gastro-pubs" probably outnumber the liquor stores. The city also has an extraordinary divide between wealthy and poor. Multi-million dollar homes are only blocks away from high density housing. The population ranges from well established (generally more wealthy) families to immigrant families that seem to be right on the edge of poverty. There is literally a Ferrari dealership a third of a mile down the street from a market that has no name apart from advertising that it accepts food stamps. The amazing thing is that nobody seems all that shocked by it; people have to buy food and gotta have Ferraris.

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Mar 1, 2012

Kerry McMahon | Baltimore, Md.

We live in Ridgely's Delight, one of the few city neighborhoods that has trees. It makes us unique. The spring blossoms seem to be a chance at renewal. They bring everyone back to life. Being able to live in the city - which can often be depressing - but also having a chance to enjoy nature, balances everything out.

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Mar 1, 2012

Linda Hall | Evanston, Ill.

I chose this photo because to me it symbolizes the changes in my neighborhood and in my life. In 2009, I had just lost my job and knew that I needed to get my chimney relined. That combined with getting doors made for the front was going to cost over $7,000. Instead I opted to convert to a wood burning stove for less than half the price. It's more practical, less expensive and more environmentally sound. When I'm home on cold days I can run the stove and not run my furnace. The papers in front of the fireplace were my study aids that helped me pass the exam to become a certified Project Management Professional -- a class I took through the Workforce Improvement Act. Everyone I know is cutting back and many people are looking to improve and expand their skill sets in the hope that knowing more will make them more attractive both personally and professionally.

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Mar 1, 2012

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About this collection

The Neighborhood Photo Project is a collaboration of Marketplace's Wealth and Poverty Desk and the Public Insight Network.