Marketplace Scratch Pad - Most Recent

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Morning Reading

Feb 26, 2010
Happy Friday. This morning: Health care yen and yang, a fantastic email and lots of stuff about Canadians......

Should we go nuclear?

Feb 25, 2010
President Obama supports the idea of increasing the country's nuclear energy. He even knows how to pronounce the word. But just as Obama is...

Investment bankers are overpaid

Feb 25, 2010
That comes straight from the mouth of Morgan Stanley Chairman John Mack. Mack is proposing an "open discussion" on compensation at investment...

Greece and WMD's

Feb 25, 2010
And they call this God's work? Toying with the financial future of a sovereign nation? That's what it's come to. Banks have been placing bets on...

Morning Reading

Feb 25, 2010
Good morning. Yesterday, we talked about how the Volcker Rule might be abandoned. Well, today, there's word that a stand-alone consumer...

Yelp needs legal help

Feb 24, 2010
There are few websites that prompt such acrimonious yelping as Yelp. Until now, the barking has been confined to blogs and comment sections, but...

Back to the future

Feb 24, 2010
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke was on Capitol Hill today, giving his latest progress (?) report on the economy. The Fed's in a tough spot. ...

Is the Volcker Rule dead already?

Feb 24, 2010
Last month, President Obama forcefully proposed an outright ban on "proprietary trading" at commercial banks. Standing beside him was former Fed...

Morning Reading

Feb 24, 2010
Good morning. Boy, Congress likes to hold hearings. Today, there are three biggies: Toyota, the Federal Reserve chairman and the insurance...

Apple's saucy apps

Feb 23, 2010
Apple's decision to delete 6,000 applications from its iPhone store is creating something of a stir. The apps were considered objectionable by...

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About this collection

Food stamps turns 50 this year.  Since the program was written in to law, it's become one of those government programs that gets a lot of attention from politicians on both the left and the right -- especially recently.  The program has been growing furiously in the last 15 years -- one in seven Americans is on food stamps today. That's more than twice what the rate was in 2000.  Some of that can be explained by changing eligibility requirements and job-losses during the recession. But the fastest growing group of food stamp participants in the last few decades are people who have jobs and work full year-round.  And that suggests a deeper new reality. Even once the recession is fully behind us, could increased use of food stamps driven by low-wage jobs be a permanent fixture of the American economy?