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Scientists snap first ever pictures of molecules before and after reaction

Using a new state-of-the-art atomic force microscope, scientists at UC Berkeley were able to capture the first images of a molecule just before and after it reacts. The images show the molecule's structure in detail, even the bonds connecting atoms. Until now, scientists have only been able to infer this type of information.

The series of images on the left side (labeled A) show the molecule before, while the images on the right (labeled B) display the after.

 


   

Non-contact atomic force microscope (nc-AFM) images (center) of a molecule before and after a reaction improve immensely over images (top) from a scanning tunneling microscope and look just like the classic molecular structure diagrams (bottom). Source: UC Berkeley News Center

 

 

 

 

 


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May 31, 2013

Put a GIF in your bike wheel

If you love GIF animations and love to cycle safely, here's a new crowd-funded product you'll love: The Monkey Light Pro. The bike accessory uses LED light bars that fit in the spokes of your wheel to create a rideable display system. Kind of ridiculous, but kind of great, too? 

 


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May 29, 2013

Happy Birthday Robert Moog!

Correction: The original entry referred to Robert Moog as still alive. He died in 2005.

Robert Moog would have been 79 today. He invented the analogue Moog synthesizer that first gained notoriety at a performance during the 1967 Monterey International Pop Festival. It's been used by keyboard lovers like Stevie Wonder ever since.

Happy 77th Birthday, Bob Moog!


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May 23, 2013

NASA footage shows meteor crashing into moon

May 21, 2013
Things crashing into the moon -- that's how the third Transformers movie starts right? Sorry Michael Bay, when it comes to explosions, we'd rather watch the NASA source footage.
Posted In: moon, NASA, space

Retired cop makes awesome robot from appliances

Mark Haygood's humanoid robot HEX was pointed out by Damn Geeky. But Gizmodo gets points for noticing the resemblance to Johnny Five. The robot's hands at least are a dead ringer for those on the best robot from the 1980s. But even if you don't see the similiarities, you have to be impressed by a guy who spent that much time putting together a robot from basic home electronics. It's been a long time since I've seen the film, but this clip holds up pretty well. No dissassemble! No dissassemble!


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May 14, 2013

Canadian astronaut covers David Bowie on International Space Station

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield has become a big hit in cyberspace with his Twitter postings from outer space. After five months on the International Space Station, Hadfield will head home to Earth today. Before he left, he made a video commemorating his time in space by covering David Bowie's "Space Oddity." Check it out below.


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May 13, 2013

Japan's brilliant Microsoft Excel artist

May 10, 2013
A 73-year-old man in Japan used Microsoft Excel to create some striking images.

Japan's brilliant Microsoft Excel artist

It takes an artist to transform the truly mundane into a thing of beauty. From Japan comes the story of Tatsuo Horiuchi, a 73-year-old artist who took Excel, the dreary spreadsheet program, and made gorgeous digital paintings -- cherry blossoms, hummingbirds, and landscapes.  Check it out, via Kotaku.


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May 10, 2013

Watch this video animation based on sine waves

Most of us know that sound can be broken down into sine waves. But Daniel Sierra took that knowledge and turned it into a stunning video animation for a thesis project called "Oscillate." He says drew inspiration from the idea that sine waves are the "building blocks of sound." The animation is great to watch, and the music is well done too. H/T Gizmodo


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May 7, 2013

Fisheye lens gets a bug-eye makeover

May 2, 2013
Researchers at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University have developed a unique hemispherical digital camera based on the eye of a fly.

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About this collection

Marketplace Tech explores the relationship between mental health and video games. Artists are creating video games to explore mental illness, psychiatrists are researching how engaging with tech influences children with autism, and therapists can help families use virtual reality to bolster their physical and mental wellness.