Mid-day Update - Most Recent

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PODCAST: Ads to match your mood and what's a dad worth?

Jun 13, 2012
The chairman and CEO of JPMorgan, Jamie Dimon, will be grilled on a huge trading loss by the bank's unit in London. Americans spend an average of $1,100 a year on clothes, and a lot of that is spent on cheap and trendy "fast fashion." Elizabeth Cline joins us to talk about the high cost of discount clothing detailed in her new book, "Overdressed." Verizon Wireless announced it's scrapping unlimited data plans which could force a change in our web surfing. And the popular '80s primetime soap, "Dallas," is getting remade with the all-important ad demographic of 18 to 35-year-olds in mind.

PODCAST: A bed that makes itself and Game of Thrones pirates

Jun 12, 2012
Global stock markets are turning their attention back to Greece and its elections this weekend that could lead to an exit from the euro. General Motors shareholders gather today for their annual meeting where one of the main questions will be: Why has the car maker's stock price been sagging in spite of its solid earnings? A new study that finds Americans paid $30 billion in overdraft fees last year despite efforts to curb them. Despite the shortened NBA season, basketball viewership is up thanks to the likes of Jeremy Lin and the 76ers.

PODCAST: A $1.3 billion billboard and LinkedIn's most popular passwords

Jun 11, 2012
Global markets are up -- for now -- on news this weekend that European leaders agreed to bail out Spain's banks to the tune of $125 billion. With California scheduled to vote on a budget this week, the question is: How did the state’s finances get so bad, so quickly? The Apple Worldwide Developers conference kicks off in San Francisco today where CEO Tim Cook will unveil the company's newest products. And a Syrian doctor in Istanbul set up a free hospital to treat Syrian opposition fighters, but middlemen ripped off his patients.

PODCAST: Animal waste as energy, and advice for grads, 'you're not special'

Jun 8, 2012
After the CEO of Chesapeake Energy was drilled by allegations of impropriety, angry shareholders are demanding change. Like the rest of us, companies are still uncertain of the economic future and holding on to their cash. But spending and investing could help to push the economy forward. The International Olympic Committee will provide live web coverage of the London games this summer to nations in Asia and Africa. And finally, what to throw out when, we give you a guide to food expiration dates beyond what's printed on the carton.

PODCAST: Food goggles and Twitter slights Facebook

Jun 7, 2012
Spain's government raised its goal of $2 billion at a bond auction this morning, but banking woes still loom. Summer movie season means it’s time for big-budget, action-adventures, but summer can also spell success for movies that ignore the desires of teenage boys. President Obama will talk to students in Nevada today about his plan to defer federal loan repayments for low-income student borrowers. Although affluent devotees are willing to pay high prices for the up-market sportwear brand Lululemon, there may be a limit to the yoga market.

PODCAST: Bad tenants and advice to live longer

Jun 6, 2012
Organized labor reacts to Governor Scott Walker's victory in Wisconsin's recall elections yesterday. Federal bank regulators head to Capitol Hill this morning to update Senators on the progress of the Dodd-Frank financial industry reforms. Words like "austerity," "sequestration" and "equity" are commonly used in news stories everywhere these days, but do you know what they mean? The recession has boosted the number of Americans on food stamps to 44 million -- nearly double pre-recession levels.

PODCAST: Disney limits junk and cars in Singapore cost more than a house

Jun 5, 2012
The seven leading industrialized nations in the world are holding an emergency conference call today about the fate of the euro and the global slowdown. Voters in Wisconsin decide today whether to recall GOP Gov. Scott Walker. At the E3 video gaming conference this week all eyes are waiting to see how Nintendo, Microsoft and Sony will counter growing competition from mobile gaming. And why do the Obama and Romney campaigns both set $3 as the entry-level donation?

PODCAST: Facebook for kids and China blocks 'Shanghai Composite Index'

Jun 4, 2012
Stocks are down all over the world this morning as investors have their first chance to react to the Labor Department's May jobs report on Friday. New Mexico's largest ever wildfire is still growing and you can bet the bill to put it out will be high. Tomorrow, if you live near a 'Pizza Patron' and order in Spanish, you'll get your pizza for free. This Tuesday the nation will watch as Wisconsin voters head to the polls to decide whether recall their Republican Governor or not.

PODCAST: 'Money Under 30' and Facebook syndrome

Jun 1, 2012
Today, the latest monthly job numbers come out and the Federal Reserve will be watching to determine their next move. Although, we hear a lot of data when it comes to the economy, everyone's story is unique. We visit a job center in Portland, Oregon to take the pulse of people who are just hitting the unemployment lines. Wal-Mart shareholders gather in Bentonville, Arkansas for the company's annual meeting. As hurricane season starts, stronger and more frequent storms have companies pulling out of parts of the Bahamas and Florida.

Former student debtor teaches others to manage money

Jun 1, 2012
A new report from the New York Federal Reserve Bank shows that student debt is up nearly 8 percent in just the last year. David Weliver, publisher of financial advice blog, Money Under 30, tells us his story.
Posted In: student loan debt

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About this collection

Food stamps turns 50 this year.  Since the program was written in to law, it's become one of those government programs that gets a lot of attention from politicians on both the left and the right -- especially recently.  The program has been growing furiously in the last 15 years -- one in seven Americans is on food stamps today. That's more than twice what the rate was in 2000.  Some of that can be explained by changing eligibility requirements and job-losses during the recession. But the fastest growing group of food stamp participants in the last few decades are people who have jobs and work full year-round.  And that suggests a deeper new reality. Even once the recession is fully behind us, could increased use of food stamps driven by low-wage jobs be a permanent fixture of the American economy?