A 3D TV viewer adorns a special pair of 3D goggles.

Honestly, if you follow technology news to any extent you quickly realize that new 3D electronics are being offered all the time. In the last week alone we've seen the Nintendo 3DS, a portable video game player that lets you play 3D games without requiring any special eye wear although you do need to hold it at a very particular angle if you want to see anything. Most other 3D products require some thing strapped to your head. Lenovo is set to debut a new 3D laptop at the end of the month. Glasses required. Some high end 3D TVs are starting to come on the market. Glasses required. We even heard about a 3D newspaper. You heard me. And yes, glasses required. That's not even including all the movies that are in 3D even when it makes very little sense for them to be.

What's going on here? Why the push for that extra dimension. That's what we wanted to know. We speak with Ross Miller of Engadget as the E3 video game expo wrapped up. He had a chance to play with the 3DS and found it weird. We also talk to market research Paul Semenza who explains the technology and marketing forces driving this trend. And we check in with University of Denver Digital Media Studies professor Chris Coleman about how the 3D works. He explains why holding your head perfectly still or wearing head gear is the way it's going to be for a long, long time.

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