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Allentown

Allentown bets big to shed its former image

Sep 11, 2014
Pennsylvania's third largest city has been dying for decades. Can it build itself back to life?
Posted In: Pennsylvania, Allentown, urban planning, development
Columbus Steel

The death of manufacturing is greatly exaggerated

May 30, 2014
A look at how one Mississippi town is bringing factory jobs back from overseas.
Posted In: Mississippi, manufacturing, factories, employment

The loaded meaning behind 'What do you do?'

Apr 9, 2014
The Atlantic's Deb Fallows talks regional differences in how we say hello.
Posted In: hello, greetings, Kansas, linguistics

CSI High: Preparing students for the job market

Mar 27, 2014
A town in Georgia has a unique problem. Too many skilled high school graduates and not enough jobs.
Posted In: high school, youth unemployment

In upstate S.C., BMW jobs replace textile mills

Jan 17, 2014
The cities of Greenville, Greer, and Spartanburg, S.C., traditionally rose and fell with the textile industry.
Posted In: Greenville, Greer, Spartanburg, BMW

In Redlands, Calif., when life gives you oranges...

Dec 20, 2013
The city of Redlands, Calif., boomed with the orange business. And even though many of the groves are gone, some hope oranges will still play a big role in the city's future.
Posted In: american futures, redlands

The economic narrative of America's future

Nov 13, 2013
As he travels for The Atlantic and Marketplace's American Futures project, Jim Fallows says there's an economic narrative for the cities and towns forging a way into the future.
Posted In: towns, economic growth

"Any landing you walk away from is a good landing."

In our American Futures series of reports from around the country, The Atlantic's James Fallows is flying from small town airport to small town airport, with Kai Ryssdal occasionally along for the ride. All that flying, obviously, involves a lot of taking off and landing. And those moments can be a bit tense, shall we say. Here's how Fallows describes what happened as they approached Eastport, Maine:

"Well, I suppose it's inevitable that when I was going to Portland, there was one of those steady, smooth approach paths where you can't be sure exactly when you've touched down because it's all so glassy. And then, when the camera is running and the radio talent is on board, we have this jolting-all-over-the-place gusty-wind approach into the little Eastport strip. When we were 3,000 feet up, Kai and I were both noting with amazement that the crosswind at that altitude was 50 knots -- a lot! It dropped off as we went lower, but in the opposite of a smooth and stabilized way -- including that sudden blow from the side when we were nearly down.

But, as I was signaling to Kai once we got down, the old aviation joke is: 'Any landing you walk away from is a good landing. And a great landing is one where you can use the plane again!'

By those standards it was an acceptable landing, and by any standards a great time in Eastport with the team. Also very glad that bird veered away just in time. Would have been worse for the bird, but a big mess for the rest of us too."

For more of James Fallows thoughts about Eastport, check out his blog at The Atlantic.


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Oct 28, 2013

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