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A star-studded UN agenda

| Sep 14, 2005
Presidents, prime ministers and kings from more than 180 countries converge on United Nations headquarters in New York today — it's the biggest world summit in the UN's 60-year history.

Thinking China in Washington

| Sep 14, 2005
A report from the Center for Public Integrity shows the Chinese government and associated companies have spent at least $19 million to lobby Congress over the past eight years. And William Kistner reports it might be even more.

Katrina hits home prices?

| Sep 14, 2005
Hurricane Katrina is predicted to take its toll on the country's economy — Marketplace Business Editor Cheryl Glaser looks at what it might mean for real estate.

The other affected fuel

| Sep 14, 2005
Officials are on the Gulf Coast this week trying to figure out how badly pipelines and processing facilities were damaged. But it's not oil we're talking — it's natural gas. Alisa Roth reports.

Something to grouse about

| Sep 14, 2005
What deer hunting is to America, grouse hunting is to Britain. But this year, an infestation of worms has caused the grouse population to plummet. Patrick Hirsch reports that hunters aren't the only ones affected.

Another suit against Wal-Mart

| Sep 14, 2005
Wal-Mart has been slapped with a class-action suit alleging that it buys good from overseas sweatshops. How might the case impact the low-cost leader? Stacey Vanek-Smith reports

A toxic decision?

| Sep 13, 2005
Today the Senate voted to keep a new EPA rule on how much mercury coal-fired power plants can put out. Take a deep breath — Marketplace's Scott Tong reports that's just want industry wanted.

Imagine $7 per gallon

| Sep 13, 2005
In London, they say it's almost a pound per liter — to us that's seven bucks a gallon. Britain is bracing for a national protest tomorrow; truckers and farmers are want the government to cut the gas tax. Stephen Beard reports.

Keeping hospitals on their feet

| Sep 13, 2005
In New Orleans, businesses, including hospitals, are struggling back to life. Some suffered catastrophic damage, others have been able to open their doors. But without patients, how long can that last? Helen Palmer reports.

A place of one's own in Baton Rouge

| Sep 13, 2005
Baton Rouge has been flooded — by people and businesses that left points south. Sam Eaton reports that suddenly becoming Louisiana's largest city creates plenty of opportunities — and strains.

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