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The week that was on Wall Street

| Mar 18, 2005
Friday means... looking forward and looking back. Host Cheryl Glaser talks to Dallas stockbroker David Johnson about what was and what will be.
Posted In: Wall Street

Iraq and a war economy: Not the U.S. boom some expected

| Mar 18, 2005
This weekend marks the second anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. More than 1500 American troops have been killed so far. And Uncle Sam has spent billions of dollars on fighting the war and trying to stabilize Iraq. Some of that cash has been funneled to American companies. But for many companies, it's not the big payday you might think. Marketplace's Scott Tong explains...

Making it in Iraq: a changing financial picture

| Mar 18, 2005
For many Iraqis, the toppling of Saddam Hussein's government hasn't yielded the economic benefits that were promised.Water and electricity are still sporadic. Unemployment is high. But some Iraqis have figured out ways to make a profit from the U.S. invasion.Others are making just enough to squeak by. As Marketplace's Borzou Daragahi reports, the financial picture changes depending on where you're looking.
Posted In: Canada

Life after two years of war in Iraq

| Mar 18, 2005
Sunday marks the second anniversary of the start of the war on Iraq. For ordinary Iraqis, the war has meant dramatic changes... Both in their personal and economic lives. Borzou Daragahi reports from Baghdad.
Posted In: Canada

War and economic sacrifice - how Americans view war

| Mar 18, 2005
This Sunday marks the 2 year anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq. Out defense efforts haven't been cheap - nearly $500 billion a year. But these days, we generally don't expect to feel much an impact in our daily lives. The American public doesn't equate war with sacrifice, the way it did in the 1940s. So, what happened? Marketplace's Scott Tong reports.

The Job Files!

| Mar 18, 2005
Time again for a look into the Job Files. Today, we meet a glass eye maker.<br>Ada Lee Halofsky produced today's Job Files.

Reinventing Retirement: Wyoming sets the example

| Mar 17, 2005
It begins in about five years. 76 million Americans are poised to join the pool of people known as retirees. More than half of that number will be out of the work force by 2013. But in one state, the future is now. And the rest of the nation might want to take note. In the second part of our series <A href="http://marketplace.publicradio.org/features/reinvent_retirement/">'reinventing retirement'</A>, special correspondent Jo Giese reports from Wyoming.

Can baseball go natural? No steroids allowed?

| Mar 17, 2005
Even if you don't know who Sammy Sosa and Curt Schilling are, you will by tonight. These guys are major-league baseball players. They were testifying on Capitol Hill today. Lawmakers are investigating the use of steroids in baseball. They have a special interest in this issue. After all, major league baseball enjoys an anti-trust exemption at the pleasure of Congress. But what can Washington do to solve the problem? Commentator and writer Ron Bailey claims with a little creativity, they could knock it out of the park.

Debating a home for the New York Jets

| Mar 17, 2005
Away from the baseball hearings on Capitol Hill, a battle is brewing over football in New York. Business of Sports Analyst Ed Derse talks to David Brown about a fight between Cablevision and the New York Jets over the new West Side Stadium.
Posted In: Wall Street

Stigma and AIDS, for Africa's women

| Mar 17, 2005
Annie Lennox and the surviving members of Queen are among the names on the all-star lineup. It's a concert this Saturday in South Africa. Sponsored by the Nelson Mandela Foundation. The object is to raise money for the many women struggling with AIDS. On the African continent, women suffer the brunt of the pandemic. But getting women to ask for treatment is difficult. Stigma is still a huge issue. From Botswana, Gretchen Wilson reports on how they've turned a challenge...into a competition.
Posted In: Canada

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